Source:   UIC Office of Programs and Academic Assessment Website

Course Request Help Topics


Major Topics and Sample Sources

(page 3 of course request)

Major Topics – Instructions

*A response to this question is required.

Special note: In all cases, indicate total instructional contact hours required for all courses except independent study. This may help you determine contact hours per week (over 15 weeks), and in turn, credit hours on page 5.

For courses which are 15 weeks in length, knowing the total contact hours each week for the course will assist you in determining total contact hours for the course. In general,

15 weeks multiplied by contact hours per week = Total contact hours taught in the course.

If you change the total contact hours here, be sure to check to see if there is an effect on weekly contact hours listed on page 5, which may effect credit hours, and adjust either or both of these responses where necessary.

It is highly recommended that these be weekly topics if possible, in which case 15 topics will be provided for most courses. A total for the topical hours should be included at the bottom of the entire listing.

For a course with fixed content (i.e., a course whose content will be the same for all students each time it is offered), enter in the major topics that will be covered in lecture/discussion and/or laboratory. In all cases, the total number of contact hours should be indicated at the bottom of the entire listing.

For a course with variable content (i.e., a course whose content will not be the same either each time it is offered or for all students who are enrolled in the course), please enter topics for a sample offering (the unit is under no obligation to offer this sample topic). Variable content courses often are special topics or selected topics courses for which a faculty member selects a topic consistent with his or her expertise. Often courses with variable content are available for a range of credit hours and/or may be repeated for credit. In all cases, the total number of contact hours should be indicated at the bottom of the entire listing.

For internship or special practicum courses, please indicate the type of experience the student will undergo, where the experience is likely to take place, and the participation of the student (e.g., observation, tutoring, teaching, clinical work, etc.).

For independent study, topics do not need to be entered. Rather, insert the following statement “Topics of study are chosen upon consultation between the student and faculty member.”

NOTE: If General Education has been selected for a 100- or 200- level course, please remember that responses in this box should adequately reflect the category or categories and the criteria selected on the GenEd page that appears after page six. The GenEd categories you may choose from are: Analyzing the Natural World, Understanding the Individual and Society, Understanding the Past, Understanding the Creative Arts, Exploring World Cultures, Understanding U.S. Society. It may be helpful to view the GenEd page before completing this section.

Examples


  1. Course with fixed content and 15 topics:

    1) Introduction to Maternal and Child Health Policy      3
    2) What is policy and the policy-making process?      3
    3) Data as the Basis for Maternal and Child Health Policy       3
    4) Case Study: MCH Legislative Policy – Guest Speaker      3
    5) Case Study: MCH Administrative Policy – Guest Speaker       3
    6) Case Study: MCH Judicial Policy – Guest Speaker      3
    7) The Relationship Between Policy and Advocacy      3
    8) The Advocates – Guest Speaker      3
    9) Policy Analysis – How to do it      3
    10) In-Class Policy Analysis      3
    11) Welfare Policy – Guest Speaker and Lecture      3
    12) Student Presentations      3
    13) Student Presentations      3
    14) Children’s versus Parental Rights – Guest Speaker      3
    15) Maternal and Child Health and the Elderly      3
    Total Hours:      45


  2. Course with fixed content and less than 15 topics:

    The Origins of Russian Literature      4
    Russian Romanticism: Zhukovsky, Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol      4
    Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin      4
    Lermontov’s Hero of Our Time      4
    Gogol’s Petersburg Stories      4
    Belinsky and Russian Criticism      4
    Russian Realism: Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy      4
    Turgenev's Rudin and Fathers and Sons      4
    Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment      4
    Tolstoy's War and Peace      4
    Russian Neo-Realism: Chekhov and Gorky      5
    Total Hours     45


  3. Course with variable content:

    Sample: Images of the Health Professions in the Media
    Images, Stereotypes, and the Media      2
    Popular Images of Nursing - Television and Film      5
    Health Care Teams and the Media      3
    Nursing: The Evolution of a Profession, the Evaluation of Images      5
    The Allied Health Profession: Issues of Image and Team Care      5
    Pharmacy and Nursing: Common Problems      5
    Medicine and Nursing: Structure and Attitudes of Relationships      5
    Total Hours:     30


  4. Sample topical summary for a fieldwork/practicum course:

    Topics discussed in this course will vary depending upon the type(s) of field experiences in which the students will be involved. The course will always consist of a one hour weekly seminar meeting at which students will receive instruction and feedback pertaining to field work and students will share experiences through presentations to the group. Students may produce an assignment or specific product for additional credit as part of this course. The amount of credit awarded for the course is dependent upon the hours of fieldwork plus assignment or product, if undertaken.

    Example sites for fieldwork experience would include independent living centers, community-based service providers, advocacy or self-advocacy groups, mental health or developmental centers, health providers, and agencies of state or local government dealing with persons with disabilities.

    Total Hours: 90


  5. Sample topical summary for an independent study course:

    Topics of study are chosen upon consultation between the student and faculty member.

    Total Hours: Variable.


Sample Sources – Instructions

*A response to this question is required.

Enter in the box the titles, authors, and dates of books and the full names of periodicals and other resources. Other resources may include films, newspapers, computer software, Internet sources.

Please place titles of books, periodicals, and films in quotes.

All required sources should be listed. Suggested or optional sources not required. If there are no sources or resource material, please indicate this.

NOTE: If General Education has been selected for a 100- or 200- level course, please remember that responses in this box should adequately reflect the category or categories and the criteria selected on the GenEd page that appears after page six. The GenEd categories you may choose from are: Analyzing the Natural World, Understanding the Individual and Society, Understanding the Past, Understanding the Creative Arts, Exploring World Cultures, Understanding U.S. Society. It may be helpful to view the GenEd page before completing this section.

Examples

  1. “Financial Accounting: A User Perspective” by Robert E. Hoskins, 1996. Assigned readings will be drawn from such sources as “Business Week” and “The Wall Street Journal.”


  2. Assigned readings will be tailored to individual students' research projects. They will involve current articles from the “Journal of Speech and Hearing Research” and other relevant periodicals.


  3. Selected current readings from the following journals:
    “Nursing Economics”
    “Nursing Research”
    “Research in Nursing and Health”
    “Journal of Nursing Administration”
    “Health Care Financing Review”
    “Health Services Research”
    “Western Journal of Nursing Research”


  4. General/introductory texts and texts on the history of film:
    Louis Giannetti, “Understanding Movies,”1996.
    David Parkinson, “History of Film,” 1995.
    Peter Bondanella, “Italian Cinema from Neorealism to the Present,”
    1983.

    Collections of essays on specific directors and films:
    Millicent Marcus,”Italian Cinema in the Light of Neorealism,” 1986.
    Millicent Marcus, “Filmmaking by the Book: Italian Cinema & Literary,
    Adaptation,” 1993.
    P. Adams Sitney, “Vital Crises in Italian Cinema: Iconography,
    Stylistics, Politics,” 1995.
    Sample of films to be shown:
    Open City; Paisan (Rossellini)
    Bicycle Thief; Umberto D. (De Sica)
    The Leopard; Rocco and His Brothers (Visconti)
    8 1/2; La Dolce Vita (Fellini)
    The Night; The Eclipse (Antonioni)
    The Gospel According to Matthew; Medea (Pasolini)
    The Conformist (Bertolucci)